Coffee Sketch Podcast

092 - A Coffee Sketch Christmas!

December 24, 2021 Kurt Neiswender/Jamie Crawley Season 3 Episode 92
Coffee Sketch Podcast
092 - A Coffee Sketch Christmas!
Show Notes Transcript

Thank you for listening. We both hope that you enjoyed this episode of Coffee Sketch Podcast. Our Theme music is provided by my brother who goes by @c_0ldfashioned on Instagram and Twitter. Our podcast is hosted at coffeesketchpodcast.com find more show notes and information from this episode. And finally, if you liked this episode please rate us on iTunes and share us with your friends! Thank you!


Music on the Show


CNEIS - https://cneis.bandcamp.com/

c_0ldfashioned - https://www.instagram.com/c_0ldfashioned/ 

Compilation - https://triplicaterecords.bandcamp.com/track/cneis-more-or-less 


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Kurt’s Practice - https://www.instagram.com/urbancolabarchitecture/ 


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Jamie on Twitter - https://twitter.com/falloutstudio 

Kurt on Twitter - https://twitter.com/kurtneiswender 


On the Web


Website - www.coffeesketchpodcast.com

Kurt’s Practice - www.urbancolab.design 

Contact Us - info@urbancolab.design 


Coffee Sketch Podcast is on YouTube for extended cuts and more visual content of Jamie’s beautiful sketches. Please consider subscribing!


https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_lQkY3-OqmHaTl_jdOgtvw 


Kurt’s Practice Urban Colab Architecture, shares about the practice of architecture and is also on YouTube. Please Subscribe to: 


https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuMXvvQXgrQIVE1uJ8QHxsw 

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Our Links

Follow Jamie on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/falloutstudio/

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Kurt’s Practice - https://www.instagram.com/urbancolabarchitecture/

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Jamie on Twitter - https://twitter.com/falloutstudio

Kurt on Twitter - https://twitter.com/kurtneiswender

Kurt Neiswender:

Hey, Jamie.

Jamie Crawley:

Almost Merry Christmas

Kurt Neiswender:

Kurt. Oh, what am I Santa? Yeah, do I look like second? You're like super festive. I got, Reno we'll train you this'll be out by Christmas. so yeah, cause showcase my, my wife's handiwork, handle. Knit hat it's beautiful. Keeps keeps this hair, this hair warm.

Jamie Crawley:

so as we have been talking about and in the last couple of episodes, so what's, what's the, what's the temperature differential. Oh yeah,

Kurt Neiswender:

yeah, yeah. let me, let me double check. You want, I'm going to give you, what's the, I'm going to give you. The fields like as well. Right? So it is 24 degrees right now with the windchill is in the single digits.

Jamie Crawley:

It's cold.

Kurt Neiswender:

So here here's the relative. So if you, if you went outside with a sweatshirt, even within a minute, you're going to start feeling that cold there. Right through, into the hidden, that hidden that body. So, yeah, so I don't go outside too much

Jamie Crawley:

right now. Still, still born in Montreal. I do remember

Kurt Neiswender:

the concept,

Jamie Crawley:

though have chosen right. To not, to

Kurt Neiswender:

not, well, how, how what's what's what's the temperature.

Jamie Crawley:

so I'm not in Austin. I'm in Dallas. but again, Texas weather, we started out with a balmy, 39 degrees. This one. so that was fun walking, walking the dog. but we're now we're up to 66 degrees this afternoon as we're recording this. So, Texas

Kurt Neiswender:

I'll take 40, I'll take 40. And, and son right now, all day. Yeah. But, one thing we passed the solstice, the winter solstice, which is, is I tip, I pretty much say it's my favorite day of the year, because I don't really like when the days get to. And so, now that they start getting longer and it's optimistic

Jamie Crawley:

well, because the winter is consist. Yeah. Cause the winter solstice is officially the shortest day. Yes. Yes. And it's all about the tilt of the earth up to the earth. And I think it's the north pole tipping away from this.

Kurt Neiswender:

That's right. This is where I teach my students in the HPAC. It's the first week. It all solar geometry. Yes. Yes, yes. Do what angle the earth is tilted at the quiz. This is a quiz question, 23 and a half degrees.

Jamie Crawley:

I was going to say 32 and I knew it was wrong. So that's good.

Kurt Neiswender:

You had the right numbers in the wrong order. So, so, let's talk about what we're drinking and then I've got some, some cool news. Let's just say, so you go first enlightened, this.

Jamie Crawley:

so, so today is, I, I, I brought some of my maple pecan, coffee, northward. but then I brought, I brought some other stuff too, that I'm gonna, try and introduce my, my pop to. So, since he's usually the one who drinks the coffee with me, so.

Kurt Neiswender:

Sounds good. So I, I swung by a place. I had to go pick up some drawings from our, my local printer to take to a, city building department, some of my weight and my weight away on my way away on my way to the office. I, a

Jamie Crawley:

hundred Canadian there for just a minute. Yeah. My having an influence.

Kurt Neiswender:

So probably we do, we we've done. We've do, we've been doing this long enough.

Jamie Crawley:

It's like almost a hundred episodes,

Kurt Neiswender:

very close, very exciting. So, there's a place called Oliver teas, which is kind of a neat little boutique grocery that has a very well stocked. liquor shelf, but also, roasts different being a combination. So I got a little bag of maple bourbon, coffee beans.

Jamie Crawley:

Really?

Kurt Neiswender:

Yeah. Maybe I should, ship some down your way. I should, I think not a, maybe I think it will looking at those, looking at the stair in my direction. I think, I think it's a, it's a must have, so it's, what's on the verdict. I mean, what's the verdict on it? It's good. It's not over the top. Either maple or bourbon. But you do smell the maple flavor, which is probably, I think the, the highlight part for me, being a fan of being a fan of Canadian people and things Canadian like maple syrup, then I think you'll like, it. Okay. How's that for a review for aye. Aye,

Jamie Crawley:

aye, aye. Flavor. I will take that endorsement and run with it.

Kurt Neiswender:

It's a new, it's a change of pace. Fine. so, so one thing before we jump into some sketches here is, I I've mentioned to you offline, Of this, this discord server, this community, this online community that I've been hanging around during this pandemic, that's called archaea marathon and the leader of archi marathon, Kevin. he, he has also has a YouTube channel called archi archi marathon. And so for those that are aware of how discord works, you can. Anytime you upload something to YouTube, you can have it automatically pop up an announcement on the server. And so, because he is aware of coffee sketch podcast, he has added us to the list of his automatic notifications. So anytime we publish something, it will now be announced to the server without me having. Yeah, self-promote

Jamie Crawley:

raise your hand.

Kurt Neiswender:

So that's just a little, little Christmas gift to Jamie. Oh, that's fantastic. Now, so he also then said, time to raise the bar because I hear is us raising the bar. Yes. So, yeah. But no pressure, but we are heading into, triple digits. we're soon, fast approaching a hundred episodes. So I think it's just another milestone for us to take things to another level. So well, and

Jamie Crawley:

I think, I think, you, you were, you were remarking and, and, and I think both of us were sort of thinking about it as well, is that, the, the, the video ones really have heavily. Forced us to think through what we're wanting to talk about a little bit differently. and, and try some of the stuff that we've been sort of experimenting with, in a little bit more deliberate fashion. So, yes, we will do some live sketching. and in the coming year, I mean, that's, which is only like, like a week away, two weeks ago. I know this very fuzzy part of the calendar, Mr. Winter solstice, but yeah. but I, I'm looking forward to that. I think that'd be a fun, a fun way for us to, both of us were talking about it, offline as well. Was this the, the idea of being able to draw and talk at the same time and, and that that's, that's a skill that's rarely discussed, but it's one. certainly exists. And it's one that you and I both enjoy doing. I think maybe that maybe that's sort of the educator in us, kind of, a foot in academia, foot in practice, like to help explain. And,

Kurt Neiswender:

so I think communicating a tool. Yeah. Yeah. Well, I know, I know I have a, a workable. Do you use a little YouTube tech term that potentially can, record me drawing, not necessarily recording my face and my hand, but Hey, I have a, a potential workaround now, Jamie. I think needs to make certain technology upgrades to get there.

Jamie Crawley:

I, I have been, my, my Christmas, my Christmas gift to you is that, I have been working on, a different. Set up, because there was also like a practicing and comfort level thing. Like, we don't want this to be like a dumpster fire, and, and, I mean, that would be bad. so there is that because as you say, we're upping our.

Kurt Neiswender:

That's right. So, yeah, so we will, I mean, not

Jamie Crawley:

like in relegation, like we're not going to get relegated to like the lower leagues and the lower divisions we're going to try and

Kurt Neiswender:

no, that's all right. Move up the table. That's right. D one D one center on our radar, but yeah. And obviously you're on vacation right now, so we will we'll look forward to that. There's lots of sketches. That's right. Yeah. As what should be done on vacation and actually my goal, a little mini goal, mark, the tape is, to try and take a little time off to, and, and I have been sketching actually, but what I need to do is post the pictures, the evidence it's like a, if a tree falls and no one's around to hear if a sketch has drawn and it's not on Instagram. Is it even really happened. So, let me, segue away from that before I get myself in, in trouble. But, what else pick our sketch that we were going to start with, which is a good, I guess a current event. prescient moment. so this is, well, I guess it's been, about a week at 12, 12. so. Drew. Well, you have to explain this better, but, and then we can talk about the technique a little bit. but pulling from the hashtag of rest in peace and interview with the vampire and make assumption that you're paying homage to Anne rice, who recently passed away the author of a interview with a vampire.

Jamie Crawley:

Yes. and so, yeah, I just, I was always, fast. with her, with her works. and I really enjoyed, I got introduced to them, kind of like in high school, like early college. and so w Voraciously tried to read as many of them as there were, that were coming out. And then there, at this time they were also sort of transitioning into, converting some of them into movies too. and so one of the things, but I mean, but the original book interview with the vampire. I didn't remember the exact year, but in reading her obituary and sort of tributes to her, sort of refresh my memory of when it was written, it was written in the 1970s, like 19 71, 19 72. And it was really kind of her first, first novel of that length and in a breakout work for her, obviously. but it was, she was living with her husband, in San Francisco at the time. And, they had just lost their daughter. who's like four or five years old. and. and so if you are familiar with interview with the vampire and sort of, some of the characters in it, there, there's a young girl in it, a young child and sort of there and is, she's turned into a vampire to, at a young age. And so they're sort of trapped in that body for, for so long. And, I think a lot of people were kind of like, oh, that's, that's so, unique and strange about, some of these characters, that, that are kind of in her work. And when you look at, you, you, you write what, that kind of old adage. And I think that was sort of her from what I've read is that, it was her dealing with grief a bit. and, and. One of the things about it though is also her ability to what I like about her, her writing is that it really weaves a very visual picture of. And so as an architect and as an artist, you can read her books and you just have this, you're right there. You, you, you, you believe the environments that she's created for these characters to interact in. And so this sketch is, is, is that homage to, a building that I've wanted to go on. cause I love the city. this isn't set in San Francisco and interview with the vampire set in San Francisco. and some scenes in other other locations, but this, this house is a particular interest in the book. and it's an actual house, Victorian, very classic, inner city, San Francisco, house. And, so this existed and it was one that she was familiar with. And so she based, the, the house that's in the book on this particular residence. And, so it's sort of become, a historic landmark, for, for those, for obvious reasons. but I just decided that, I would find a picture. and, as we've talked about it's on those lists of places that you would want to go and see, and, so, just seemed, seemed like a good sketch and it had the photo I found had a neat vantage point. so I, I kind of kind of leaned into it, try to try some different techniques actually. and. It just, not to belabor it, but it was, I was doing a lot of work on historic structures for work at this time. And so it sort of weaved in really, really good with things that I was already sort of focused on. and, and trying some different techniques and sort of rendering things there. And. Brought them over here. and, I think, I'm pretty pleased with it. There's those aspects of it that don't, that always sort of bug ya. but, yeah,

Kurt Neiswender:

that I don't see. I mean, I'm not, there's nothing that bugs me, but the, yeah, it's nice to see. I want to, before I, Talk about a couple of the details in this sketch. I want to tell a little interesting story that I have a connection to interview with a vampire with a, and then we can segue cause we have one more sketch that we wanted to relate this sketch to as far as technique, we we've mentioned in the past that I had worked with, Stan Winston back when I worked in California and I did some design work to remodel a house of his and as a, as a bonus, he invited me to his studio and I've told you about this, right? Yeah, yeah, yeah. And so. Walking

Jamie Crawley:

around, but it seems like an ever, like, like a gift that keeps on giving, which I can imagine his studio being that kind of a place where you're like, oh yeah. And oh yeah. And then there's this other thing.

Kurt Neiswender:

So I'm excited. I'm excited. Exactly. Exactly. So, so without, without further delay, I guess, So we're in this conference room, which I mean, yes, his conference room becomes this. Oh. And, and, and it's basically surrounded by all of his creatures that he's created in the various movies. Like, so, so the tables in the middle, long conference table, and then there's these sort of these three tiered platforms and it's surrounding the whole thing. The costumes of the characters, right? So there's all kinds of, we talked about Danny DeVito in Batman returns, so there's that, but there's also a Tom cruise vampire. And I don't know if you knew, but he worked on a interview with a vampire, the movie for a very specific. Scene and it's the scene. So the, the costume or the creature that he created. Posed in the scene at which Tom cruise is dying. And so he's kind of crawling on the ground. So he's down in the characters down on the ground. And so Stan Winston created animal trial. Robot character version of Tom cruise. So he, I mean, it's a perfect, I mean, it's kind of a decaying face. It's sort of half the empire, half Tom cruise and the makeup artistry on, on his characters really. I mean, everything he did, I mean, it's like perfect copy of, of the human character, real people that he, that were the actors and. and so when he told me the story that Stan told me was that in the movie, as the character is dying, it's they filmed it with Tom cruise and then they filmed like the very finish of it with his robot and it edited together as seamless. Right. So like, you can't tell when it becomes. when it stops being human, Tom cruise to robot, Tom cruise. And so he's got. Animatronic thing, like still very creepily posed in his conference room. And I pointed it. I was like, I didn't know that you did interview with a vampire. He's like, oh yeah, yeah, yeah. You, that scene and then he goes into it and it's just, it's so cool that. I don't, it was very cool to see, like, we've talked about getting to go behind the curtain behind the scenes and then hear all the stories from, the late, also the late great Stan Winston, so he's no longer with us. So, I feel very lucky to have had that opportunity in that space. And, so I'll say. some of the other care we'll, we'll talk about. Well, I'm sure we will talk about some other characters, but, that was one that, definitely stood out in that space and it makes me want to rewatch the movie for sure. And maybe re reread the book. From from Anne rice. But, so anyway, so, so that's my little side anecdote. And then, with, with this, with the sketch of his house, which, it was a very classic San Francisco Victorian row house. I don't know. Is it a painted lady? Is it, yeah, it kind

Jamie Crawley:

of, one of the painted lady type. and, and, and there's, and I think that, that's the one thing that I was, I was sort of struggling with was that there's an intricacy of the patterning details in not just, deep relief. So like at the cornice, near the, near the parapet, there's, a lot of. as elements are built up and so you can get that shadow depth, and then also sort of draw in a lot of the detail work. But what I found challenging as well was that there were. Flat panel locations, and then also stained glass, insets, that were also had a pattern in and of themselves, which I thought was really fascinating to see all happening on a, on a relatively small elevation. but I just it's that extra pattern work. That's all, when it's, there's less depth of field. so less room for creating the shadows to create the effect. I found that a little bit difficult. it, it works in the sketch and you pick up on the pattern, but I think I probably could have executed a little bit differently,

Kurt Neiswender:

but sometimes with sometimes with a good sketch is what's not there. That makes it a good thing. And one thing I noticed right away is I'll hover my mouse over here, but the down the lower lower corner. Well, the diagonal sketch with the lower corner and we have this, this heavy, heavy line that profiles, a stoop or some other structure. I think you, you hold tell us what it was, but it's nice to see just this void of white because we have a very animated, and text. Shadow of, space between buildings and the corners, like you mentioned in the Gable. and then we have this sort of clean white sort of relief and, and, and so it has a nice, balance as you have the base. And then the, the space above where in this case, Jamie did not render the sky it's so unlike some of his. Favorites of mine with a very moody sky render this case if there's no, no render. So, so that's, that's one thing I think that strikes a nice balance on this, on this page.

Jamie Crawley:

And it's another one point, like it's, it's another, it's another one point, which is sort of, I mean, I, I was checking all the boxes on this one for getting out of my comfort zone. and yeah, but the space down below, was in this particular case was the one piece of the architecture that had been altered over to. so, sometimes these were, garages or, accessory dwellings or storage spaces or accessory commercial units, kind of at the street front. cause you remember that in, in San Francisco, for those who are sort of trying to picture it, like us using words to try and, generate the image here. you can imagine the painted lady kind of Victorian houses and sort of the, the topography of San Francisco with the streets. And so a lot of these, multilevel Victorians, as, as the streets ascend, they have some steps and so there's a, sometimes space at the street level, for a very small. to really kind of activate the sidewalk. And so in this, in this particular case, that was there, but I decided to focus more on the residents as opposed to the, the building in front. And like you say, kind of tried to establish a balance on the page between sky and, and foundation. And I think it works. and then of course, kinking the book to, to really kind of emphasize. Elongating it a little bit more.

Kurt Neiswender:

Yeah. Yeah. And there's, layers, right? You have the, the front layer, which is very white, the main event in the middle, and then in the background is back to white. And so, even though it's, it's basically the blank page, it's still kind of reads as a third layer beyond. And, let me, let me quickly switch over to. follow-up here, because what, what we thought was a nice or a tie in, or a segway I guess is, or maybe it's just me. And then you can tell me if I'm wrong, but the, the way you've rendered these trees against this, concept or two concepts of a building, actually is really nice. Yeah, the silhouette of the tree is there. but you don't need every single leaf and twig and, opaque the opacity of a solid tree, to, to make. The scene. because in actuality, what you're trying to do is sell a couple of ideas for this particular building, restoration rights. Cause there's a couple of different facade moves that you're doing that you would not see if you just drawn the tree. It's like, sorry. I was just gonna say what I teach my students is to kind of think. Yeah, I think on the fly a little bit and adapt, right? I mean, this is not, the sort of training of how to render a scene. you there's no by the book, right. That you say, okay, well the building and then it's covered with trees and there's people and then, and you've done. Cause if you did that, you wouldn't see. And how do you utilize your, your you're getting extra mileage out of two sketches that could maybe take four more. If you had to take the vegetation away from

Jamie Crawley:

the, I have to, or have to develop multiple views of the same facade. And you're really trying to, maximize effort, in this particular case, it's a corner. and, and just as, as you were describing it, I really appreciated you sort of thinking through it as a design problem, because it, it in fact was, is this particular building from its sort of a, it's a two level structure. with almost a Romanesque type or a Neo Romanesque kind of base on the front corner. And, and that's original that that whole piece on the bottom is actually all original. And then even the stone elements on the, on the corners and the columns are all original, storefronts been modified a little bit that sort of recessed on that first level. encouraging them to try and, restore elements of that. But, but effectively it's, it's in the same sort of configuration that it's always been activating the street on the corner, but from that mid. Belt of the building up to the actual corners and to the, the, the upper portions of the facade. though it's also obscured by street trees that have grown up over time. And it's nice to have the street trees for sure. to kind of create. Synergy of outdoor space, that public domain, and sort of the, the, a walkable, downtown all that's all, those are good things, but as those trees were also obscuring the facade in this particular case, as we see in a lot of our old downtowns, is there were periods of time when slipcovers. Came into play. And so instead of oftentimes preserving and restoring or repairing, upper facades, they would, cause those openings were there. The windows were. more elements, architectural elements, details, architectural details, brick elements, stuccoed elements, decorative, cornices, all those things were often times on these buildings, but some of those would deteriorate over time. And so it was a maintenance problem. So sometimes in those instances they would cover them up and they would cover them up with a new material or as they. what was more often the case, is that as they would think about modernizing the bottom storefront, they would also modernize the area above that and treat it like a billboard in a sense. And so they would take on a. large area for signage, but also sort of simplify the structure and sort of streamline it in a way that harken to new technologies and sort of new aesthetics that were sort of 50, 60 seventies, aesthetics of buildings. And that's, and that's not that they were necessarily trying to strip away details, but it was, the aesthetics were changing. And so in an effort to modernize them, modernize these shells, these buildings, these containers, they would oftentimes cover up a lot of the very, very intricate details that we now really know. We, we can appreciate and celebrate and sort of, that juxtaposition of old and new. and restoring the old and kind of holding on to it and then inserting new things into it. and kind of that, that play between the two elements, takes a little bit of design work, takes a little bit of creativity and thinking, and, careful analysis. What was going on with those slip covers is there was sort of just sort of putting an extra second skin on them. It's fortunate from the standpoint that they oftentimes didn't demo the things that were behind it. So in essence, they're giving us the opportunity now to kind of re-investigate those things. In this particular case, this building, when the slip cover gets removed, Some of the architectural elements have been corroded over time. the openings are there, but it's sort of questionable if, if other things have happened and then there's also the L the there's no foot, there's no historic photographs of this building. So we're not entirely sure what's kind of going on on the upper level. so in this particular case, the reason why there's two sketches is two. Use the geometry and the form of the building to suggest. And then the evidence of the things that we were able to find suggest two alternative design directions that would be, historically. for the design, but at the same time would all be rendered in newer materials so that you're, you're not confusing things as to what's what's original, original. and, and what's been, done in the present day and, and making the trees transparent, allows a lot of those things to occur. Just like the slip covers themselves. We're hiding things, the trees, we're also sort of hiding a lot of things about this building and obscuring, the big, big signage that that slipcover was supposed to be helping with. and that sign at that level is more about the car than about the pedestrian and the street, at the, at the end of the day. and so rethinking those things and re-evaluating kind of brings us to where we are with, with the sketch.

Kurt Neiswender:

Yeah, no, that was really a nice, sorry, my feedback. Or hopefully, hopefully the thing doesn't record the feedback. We'll see, because it just makes my life a little more challenging when trying to, to edit these things. But, no, thanks for, the brief sort of explanation of. How, these buildings do change over time. And, and even considering the, the growth of trees, from smaller, smaller scale street trees, and then they get mature and then, they start to create this whole. texture to the, to the scenery, the space, the street life. it reminds me, there is a building here in Flint that there is photographic evidence. but the building is currently occupied, by, like a county services kind of, facility, but it was a former Buick dealership. Hmm for the city of Flint, which has this two stories, and I believe it was built even with the capacity to have cars on the second

Jamie Crawley:

floor, actually actually pretty common. I, I was surprised to learn that in a lot of our cities as well, with some of those buildings that had an automobile kind of function. and it doesn't, it's sort of seems counterintuitive today. back then, that's the way a lot of them were, were designed for a multitude of reasons. So, yeah, I I'm, I'm not surprised. That sounds cool.

Kurt Neiswender:

Yeah. I'm going to have to dig up some of the, I have a friend, in the, in that, in that neighborhood, excuse me, that I think has some of the photos of it, but the, so basically it's the same thing. Is it the it's a super beautiful. corner building that has, all this detailed columns. And I mean, it's, it would be early, what, 19, probably thirties, maybe slightly sooner if it was, or, Buick. Is his stuff out there as quick as possible, but, it's been reclad in what we call So exterior insulating finishing system EIFS for those who know it's, it's sort of like a pseudo stucco. It's foam panels with a sort of cementitious stucco like material. And it, it, it basically is wrapped this entire thing in this gray, this dull gray step, ethos, material, and, some of the panels. Fallen off. And, and there have been a couple of people over the years that want to totally pull that stuff off and restore the original building, but it's definitely going to be an expensive endeavor. And, I would love to see that

Jamie Crawley:

happen though. And well, and, and, in, in a lot of those cases and just like the, with the slip covers it's to in today's world, if you had a historic building, that maybe had this upper-level with windows and details and things like that, there might be a situation where, somebody comes in and says, oh, well, I'm gonna, I'm gonna modify this building. And in those cases they would just start blowing out opening. and, and removing material, he didn't and demoing things and altering it significantly and drastically that way. What, at least we're fortunate to have with when their slip covered or near in the case you're talking about with the They're sort of encapsulating the building that, sort of that sort of, they're putting it under glass, I wish. but they're, they're, they're, they're putting it with this sort of protective shell. it's like that. Do you remember? and here's, here's the, we haven't had one of these in a while. do you remember like this maybe like elementary school, how awesome this was. Magic shell. Did you ever get magic shell or like go to that one friend's house who had magic shell? Like he'd get ice cream and then they would like have the, the, the chocolate sauce that you would pour on the ice cream. And it would come out liquid from the bottle, but there was some probably terrible ingredient in there that would, it would, it would become like a hard shell and it was just fascinating that like, oh, it's liquid. And then it becomes like, It's like a hard shell.

Kurt Neiswender:

Yeah, I think so. Yeah.

Jamie Crawley:

Yeah. So that's imagine that's what they're doing with these buildings in, in, in, in the way back is they're putting this magic shell on, on the building. So the real building is still underneath there. It's just that the trick though is, is in, in their execution. did they damage the building to put this outer shell on and that's, and that's usually the hard part to convince a new owner, about is no, no, you can, you can peel back layers and you can, you can open up certain small sections and take a peek and see how they maybe did it because it's really it's. It's the anchoring of that outer skin, to the inside. And if they did it in a, a relatively straightforward way, there might be ways to repair it. but then in other cases, they might have chipped away at, tons of material and, and really made a mess of what's underneath. so. I think the regrettable part of, of some of these types of rehabilitation projects, but like you were just describing, when you see photos of these buildings and you, and you can maybe get some hint that some of that still there that's, that to me is, it's enough of an opportunity for some detective work architecturally to imagine a new future for. and that's what, and that's what this project was,

Kurt Neiswender:

is very apropos of, the Christmas season. It's like unwrapping a present, but it is, it's a nice little. segue or w what's what, what's not a segue. but analogy, you just put a bow on it. Yeah. I'll have to, I'm going to dig up those pictures. but yeah, thanks for, this two sketches actually really kind of drew out a really interesting, conversation about, preservation techniques and, and, No consideration of building. So, but before we go, I know you and I both wanted to, just drop this hint because we're probably gonna do a little homework, but here we are today, today, as we record, this is matrix resurrections day. Yes it is. Which I can't believe how long it's been. I remember when we. When we saw the first tease of, of a possibility of this movie. Oh. And, and,

Jamie Crawley:

and we just, the two of us were like, Kids in a candor candy store. Like we had so much like magic shell ice cream in, thoughts in our minds and Christmas presents and bows and unicorns. And yeah, it was all kinds of fun.

Kurt Neiswender:

When did, when did you, do you remember when you first posted this one? So this is a repost.

Jamie Crawley:

Yeah, I knew, I couldn't remember how far back it was. So I had to like do a little scrolling, but it was April 20, 20.

Kurt Neiswender:

Oh. So that must have been when, and that was the original, right? The first, when you actually sketched

Jamie Crawley:

it. Yeah. This, yeah. This sketch is an OJI sketch.

Kurt Neiswender:

Yeah. So, so then that must've been, when they announced. I think so the new movie. So there you go. I you've you've, you've answered my, my, my conundrum. So yes, over a year we have, we have had to wait, but today's the day. Today's the day. I'm very excited. Yeah. So what we're going to do is we're going to watch. And, maybe be text commentary, commentating to each other possible. And then we're gonna get back on the, the re the zoom records and, and do a little recap of, of, a little piece of scifi. what's the word Canon some Saifai cannon. Absolutely. And, and talk about. How the new, the new matrix fits in with the old trilogy. And, and, and maybe this sketch will have some new meaning after that. Yeah.

Jamie Crawley:

And then I think the question will be like where their tears shed in watching this movie. So, possibly

Kurt Neiswender:

I'm not crying. You're crying. Yeah.

Jamie Crawley:

Awesome.

Kurt Neiswender:

Thanks man. All right. Thanks a lot.