Coffee Sketch Podcast

Batman Day 2021

September 29, 2021 Kurt Neiswender / Jamie Crawley Season 3 Episode 86
Coffee Sketch Podcast
Batman Day 2021
Show Notes Transcript

Thank you for listening. We both hope that you enjoyed this episode of Coffee Sketch Podcast. Our Theme music is provided by my brother who goes by @c_0ldfashioned on Instagram and Twitter. Our podcast is hosted at coffeesketchpodcast.com find more show notes and information from this episode. And finally, if you liked this episode please rate us on iTunes and share us with your friends! Thank you!


Music on the Show


CNEIS - https://cneis.bandcamp.com/

c_0ldfashioned - https://www.instagram.com/c_0ldfashioned/ 

Compilation - https://triplicaterecords.bandcamp.com/track/cneis-more-or-less 


Our Links


Follow Jamie on Instagram  - https://www.instagram.com/falloutstudio/ 

Follow Kurt on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/kurtneiswender/ 

Kurt’s Practice - https://www.instagram.com/urbancolabarchitecture/ 


Coffee Sketch on Twitter - https://twitter.com/coffeesketch 

Jamie on Twitter - https://twitter.com/falloutstudio 

Kurt on Twitter - https://twitter.com/kurtneiswender 


On the Web


Website - www.coffeesketchpodcast.com

Kurt’s Practice - www.urbancolab.design 

Contact Us - info@urbancolab.design 


Coffee Sketch Podcast is on YouTube for extended cuts and more visual content of Jamie’s beautiful sketches. Please consider subscribing!


https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_lQkY3-OqmHaTl_jdOgtvw 


Kurt’s Practice Urban Colab Architecture, shares about the practice of architecture and is also on YouTube. Please Subscribe to: 


https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuMXvvQXgrQIVE1uJ8QHxsw 


Tags


In situ, art, architecture, sketching, coffee, coffee sketch, podcast, coffee sketch podcast, what an architect does, design, design thinking, drawing, buildings, building sketches, sketches, pen, paper, sketchbook, coffee stains, watercolor, pencil sketches, markers, black and white, architects, architecting, ink sketch, ink drawing, cafe sketch, cafe sketching

Kurt Neiswender:

Hey, Jamie, how you doing?

Jamie Crawley:

Good morning. How are

Kurt Neiswender:

you? So it's still morning, I guess it is still morning for you. We're we're crossing over I'm in the afternoon. Oh, I just, I just marketed no, no sponsorships by Sloot Schluter systems, but I do have their mug. They do make good stuff though. So maybe they could sponsor us in the future. Did you? Didn't get to go on a good tour too. Yeah. In a, in a beautiful city. That Putin is.

Jamie Crawley:

I have an infantry over. Yes.

Kurt Neiswender:

So, which has some relevance to today that, you know, this is unplanned. See, I'm totally unplanned, unplanned, because Montreal is known for their French speaking and we have some French, today's talk and

Jamie Crawley:

not only. But you are going to start out with a question for me about this, Buckminster fuller reference.

Kurt Neiswender:

So, oh yeah. Right before we get to that. Yeah. Yeah. Before we get to France, get ahead of ourselves. So let me, let me share because we are, oh, you know, shared a, shared the sketch that our first sketch that we're going to talk about, but I wanted to let you know. That the, well, you already know that the last episode is on YouTube in addition to our regular audio format. And we already have at least four subscribers from a very. Experimental amount of, promotion or we haven't done a ton of promotion yet. Yeah.

Jamie Crawley:

Well, and, and that's, that's, I would say that's a faster upswing than we, then we started out with the podcast. so, you know, who knows all, that's all,

Kurt Neiswender:

maybe everyone's waiting for the audio or the video version. So hopefully, so this is a, a slight refinement from the. So now, we have the full screen and I do hope it shows up full screen. This is the sketch, right? Cause it's the main event. It's really the highlight of, of these conversations where the focal point is to look at Jamie's awesome sketches. And so hopefully it's. full screen format for

Jamie Crawley:

everyone. I'm here for the coffee. So I don't know about you, but

Kurt Neiswender:

what are you before we talk about, Buckminster fuller? What are you drinking

Jamie Crawley:

at the moment? Brought props since I know that I, since I know that we're

Kurt Neiswender:

well, hold on. I can go back. Cause I don't know with this little screen record, let's just go back to stop the share. So we could see, can you, can you see, yeah. Pull it over a little closer to you. There you

Jamie Crawley:

go. See it's that left and right thing that we're talking about, but yeah, no, this is, yeah, and so it's a California company, then, apparently has been around for a while, but I just, I recently found them. And, and I think that the Venice park sort of, and the flavor offering was, was sort of what drew me to it. I was looking for something different, honestly, let's be honest. I was looking for something that I'd never tried before. and I've been pleasantly surprised. it's, it's sort of, it's described as having sort of a, a marshmallow and chocolate kind of note to it. and so I'm thinking cause more, and. Campfires. And so we're getting into the fall. So I thought, yeah, why not? Let's try it and see if we can come up with a, a different house burned. for me, I've been pretty pleased.

Kurt Neiswender:

So groundwork, although down in Texas, it sounds like, you know, And he campfires right now.

Jamie Crawley:

It's still really hot. Yes. We had said we had our, we had our cold spell, it dropped a few degrees and now we're we're about,

Kurt Neiswender:

so, you know, up here we're getting that fall, the fall format of a cool morning, then it warms up and then it cools down again in the evening. So, I mean, I think it was 55.

Jamie Crawley:

See you in Texas, it's sort of like 80, it looks 70. It's like as if Texas went to school and learned that that exists as a concept, but doesn't know how to implement it. So the temperature, like when, you know, you don't get that full site. you know, you, you mentioned to me once about the air flushing, your house, you know, for the, you know, at the cool and the warm during the day and yeah.

Kurt Neiswender:

Well you need, like, you need more of a three degree swing. Yeah, exactly.

Jamie Crawley:

Exactly. Like checks is like read it and goes, oh yeah, that's swing. Okay.

Kurt Neiswender:

Well I'm glad you're enjoying the new. the new coffee though. And here's

Jamie Crawley:

so what are you, having in your,

Kurt Neiswender:

your Montreal mug? Yeah, Schluter systems in my cup is, some more, I've been ultra hyper loyal to our local, rootless coffee roasters here in Flint. So now I'm, I'm back on the dark blend, the one they call dark. Which is their dark blend with a, with a cool, I don't have the show and tell, but you know, it has a Crow on the

Jamie Crawley:

cover. Well, and I would say that, no, we're not going to talk about the movie, the Crow, but we should add that to like our notes because you know, that, that movie and that sound and that soundtrack, I mean, I think we're going to talk about soundtracks a little bit today, but. No, I will say that rootless from a graphic design and bag perspective is they, they bring it and I appreciate that. So, yeah.

Kurt Neiswender:

Yeah. We use different artists for each

Jamie Crawley:

one. We need to get them on the podcast. That's that's who we need to be talking to, but yeah.

Kurt Neiswender:

work, I got my notes. See, look here. This is my pen.

Jamie Crawley:

Gotcha. No

Kurt Neiswender:

rootless. So that's, you know, sticking with, but I, I kinda, you know, now we just, high five rootless. but I, I, I'm actually kind of inspired by Jane. Experiment to a California coffee. Now I kind of want to try something.

Jamie Crawley:

Well, groundwork has been good. Take-up sub grounded groundwork was a

Kurt Neiswender:

safe bet, small detour to something, something different for, for while I'm getting near the end of this bag. So maybe that's what all I'll be on the lookout for. So I've now reshared my screen back to your sketch and, and we'll, I think I'll bring up the, the music thing in a second here, but. I was struck by the drawing cause it is it, you know, well being an architect, right. When we hear or see the word Buckminster fuller, we start to think about structural geometry expression of the structure of a building, you know? So then I'm, then I'm thinking, okay, so then this drawing, right, we have this, this sort of trust. volume or roof, roof structure, canopy. And, at first it didn't, it didn't ring a bell until I had. So I had to ask you what the building was, which the hashtag clues didn't I guess, sink in quite fast. So, so tell me more about the, the, the drawing and why the book is there because normally Jamie doesn't use.

Jamie Crawley:

Does he use petition for sin? Yeah, no props in the sketches of then the pen and the coffee cup. but, yeah, no, so sir, yes. Bucky fuller, you know, whenever we kind of get that reference in our lives, you know, it certainly the images that come to mind have, a structural vein to them and, and of course, No, the story is really sort of a simple, you know, how, you know, connecting the dots and Jamie's brain. And there was in the Twitter verse, a very, strange. Tweet from, one of the owners of Austin FC, the soccer club here in town. Matthew McConaughey, you might've heard of him, you know, actor writer, any outright. All right. All right, exactly. And, and apparently purveyor of strange and cryptic tweets. so he posts the tweet. All it says is architecture is. Has a picture of himself in a hard hat with the Austin FC logo emblazoned on it. It's in that portrait format. So you have no idea where he is and it set everybody ablaze of w are they doing an announcement of something, you know, is he crazy? Well, like, you know, determined, you know? And then, and then of course it's, and then of course, Twitter, you know, both the soccer and architecture camp of which maybe I'm a crossover. so I felt like the tweak was for me, you know, there was a, there was definitely a part of me that said he's speaking to me directly. And I was agreeing with him. yes, architecture is a verb. and then there were others who chimed in much later on from the architecture, Twitter verse who like, of course had to correct him on whether or not architecture was a verb. and, at that point, interestingly enough, I did not see a single person. In that architecture, Twitterverse bring up Buckminster fuller and his classic book, I seem to be a verb. So that's my rabbit hole. But, but yeah, the sketch, it was funny. It was that, you know, Wow. You know, this stadium, really is an expression of structure and a lot of in a lot of sports stadiums are. and, and I think that, that's, you know, sort of architecture and engineering, Marvel, and art Marvel, of form and sculpture. And, you know, in, in this particular case, it's, it's about, Solar protection, rain protection, but also increasing sound. so there's sort of a consciousness of sort of trapping sound and redirecting it, you know, in, in a very, very enclosed or semi semi enclosed environment, as well as being. kind of a beautiful form. And, so this is one of the, the, the sketches sort of have an entry sequence, and you S you don't see the pitch. but you do see sort of one of, one of the sides of the main grand stand and sort of its expression structurally.

Kurt Neiswender:

Well, you know, it's interesting, you brought up acoustics in that. I have a, I have a good friend, a classmate from undergraduate days who went on. I don't know if I've mentioned her previously, but she went on and got a PhD in acoustic science, in building science, right. Specifically acoustical building science and, So now she works. She, I think she's actually a principal. What do you call it? What do we, what do we, try? What am I trying to say here? I'm I'm tooting my friend's horn, not my own horn, but I'm, shamelessly plugging, but no, principal at Arab and, and leads, leads a studio on acoustics in, in building suits. Yeah. Which 1, 1, 1 fun fact, right? As being a USC alum, as, as, as the acoustic principle or one of the acoustic principles, she worked on some of the renovation work on the Coliseum, the LA Coliseum that, USC football plays their games in. And, so she got to go back. As a, a highfalutin cuticle engineer scientists, and, develop some solutions to, kind of like what you were saying. So it's, some of it is to, there's like a twofold thing about anyway, the real reason to bring it up is this, the science behind acoustics and architect is structural. Stadium design and so on. I mean, there's a whole lot going on, like you mentioned, but, part of the experience is avoiding the sound, leaving the stadium and creating a nuisance for your neighbors, but also to trap it back in to intensify the experience for the people inside the space. And I didn't, I didn't really think. At first, when she, I had her guest lecture for one of my classes and talk about some of these projects, it didn't really, resonate, no pun intended to,

Jamie Crawley:

all puns intended to try

Kurt Neiswender:

on the podcast to try and intensify the interior environment in a setting like a stadium. So any.

Jamie Crawley:

Well, and certainly, you know, I think it's, I think it's unique, and something that sort of, isn't visually obvious to folks. I think, When everyone thinks of the sporting events and just crowd size and people with, you know, meters trying to read the decibel level, and you know, and, and putting their earplugs in and all that, you know, all that kind of stuff. And everybody sort of can visualize all those things or experience those things. But I think the unique part, and what's sort of evident in, in what you're describing at USC, And then also here with Austin FC is, and with this sketch really is that you, you really sort of see this air foil of a, of a roof structure. And so the underside of it, interesting enough, it's sort of a perf metal. So there's a, there's a perforated skin. That's allowing the, sound waves. Both get redirected and in some ways, but also, I think transfer through it at a different rate. And so, because they're not necessarily reverberating off of a surface. And, I think that that's, it becomes really kind of interesting because I think from. All intensive purposes of having experienced many, many matches there now is that it is a really, really loud environment. And it's a very kind of live space. we talk about live and dead spaces, you know, in acoustics. I think that the trick about Austin upstate, you know, I've talked about this with a lot of friends who who've attended and, and other folks as well. And you kind of hear this, from, you know, kind of people's commentary is that the trick about acoustics is also sort of trusting the architect. to do its job and then, and letting that fan experience sort of, you know, be what it needs to be. you know, supporter sections for soccer, they bring drums and things like that. Very similar to almost like a college football environment like you're describing, but it's, I think that the unnecessary evil in this is sometimes they also have the actual speaker system too loud in the stadium. And so, you know, there's the

Kurt Neiswender:

competing,

Jamie Crawley:

competing sounds of sort of match announcer and, and, you know, stadium, ambient sound it's almost becomes unnecessary. and the architecture itself is especially when the architecture is doing its job. And so someone from Arab, you know, certainly, you know, kind of the gold stamp. Have, you know, blending, architecture and engineering. That's, that's fantastic to hear and, and, and nice to hear that she's able to connect with some of your students for a lecture. That's pretty

Kurt Neiswender:

awesome. Yes. Elizabeth if you're, if you're actually listening. thank you. Cause it was, I think we, I was able to get her on the calendar like a week before she was due for her

Jamie Crawley:

first child. Wow. So, yeah. So you were calling in favors, like at all levels?

Kurt Neiswender:

Yes, I was. I was, very thankful and she did a fantastic job and kind of inspired. My students to, sorta think, think beyond that, the core, like the core textbook things, that speakers amplification. So, yeah, she really, she really makes it fun and she does teach a little bit too. So I think, the, what was I gonna say? She has a natural ability to, she's just a very lively person

Jamie Crawley:

enemy's already

Kurt Neiswender:

there. She makes a lot of things fun. So anyway, speaking of. Fun. Yeah. So, and some news, right? I mean, something that we've been we've we've discussed before and, and, and, and I wanted to bring this back up. So I recently heard in the news and you must have as well, because you just created this brand new sketch of, the Christo project on the arc de Triomphe in Paris, France. we had our friend, our good friend, Matt In season, was it season one or two? I can't remember. It's been awhile. We'll have to look back. I was just, kind of trying to do some cataloging and I, I w I saw the, the, thumbnail from that episode and, and remembered how much of a good time. But anyway, Matt, Matt and yourself are two big fans of Cristos work while I I'm a fan too. But I think both of you, are a little extra fans and that's okay. And, so we had a really interesting conversation about Christo's work. I think Matt seen other examples. Jamie has seen other examples. Not this project, but other projects by him. And, and so basically for, to, to, I should've led with this part is that this exhibit or this, installation by Christo is finally. In the flesh or in the curtain out there. and so what, you know, Christo is known for is wrapping kind of wrapping, significant features in, in fabric and usually a single, a single color, usually a fairly bright and punchy color that it, so he shrouds entire structures like this. They are turning off this completely shrouded in a, in a fabric and, It definitely changes the perception and perspective of, of these, these objects. And, then they don't stay up permanently. but it's a sort of a, kind of an interesting way to like hide a historic or significant structure. it takes on a different kind of appearance. And then, then I think I'm sure the, another exciting moment is sort of like when you. The structure and then Cristos fabric goes away and then you're re introduced to this. Architecture that you, you know, maybe have taken for, for granted over the years, because it's just there, you know, something like the arc de Triomphe, right. Which is just, my French pronunciations, probably very terrible. But, anyway,

Jamie Crawley:

I love that. I love that, that perspective on it. I think, you know, it is, it is sort of like a gift. I mean, it's a, it's sort of a gift of viewing it this way for one thing. and then also a gift of, you know, the memory of it wrapped as well as sort of, you know, being present again in a, in a, in a different way. with, with it unwrapped. I think there's, I recently saw in, in sort of leading up to this, this installation becoming complete and, and, and being unveiled, so to speak, there was, a little clip of Christo, you know, talking about, his, and Jean-Claude, their, their process. And the reason why the artworks are temporary. and the reason why, you know, you can't necessarily buy this, this particular piece of art. you know, they, they do sell and they've always sold, more traditional. Pieces of art to finance these projects. but then in the signature piece, the one that everybody talks about the, the event architecture is the way I like to think about it. It's sort of event architecture is sort of, you know, and is, is riding that fine line with art. And, I think that there's. Inherent design challenges with doing something like this that really blends the best of both the art and the architecture. and then the fact that it's, it is as you described it, wrapping a piece of architecture, you know, that's recognizable, you know, big a architecture and then, in literally sort of transforming. Is is really sort of a special thing and hate, and he describes it and describes both that process, but also the temporary nature of it. And that it is there's a, there's a democratic aspect to it, is sort of the way he describes it as well. Where it's, this is art. and the, the event is for the people. And I think that it's so fitting that in a city that they love so much in Paris, and really sort of, you know, started, you know, started their career is, you know, this piece, you know, now that they've both passed, you know, I think this piece is sort of a beautiful kind of lasting memory and lasting image. you know, the Sean's Elisa is closed. and you know, people are walking up to this, on a street that was, you know, one of, maybe one of the busiest in Paris for a long time. And you know, that axial nature of that city, for those who visited or have seen images of it, you have these sort of icons at different, different points along these axes and the Sean's Louise a and, and they are are definitely those, those memorable images. I mean, you see something like this, or you see, the loop or you see the Eiffel tower and you immediately know what city you're in. you know, and, and I think that that's. you know, it's, you know, the ambition and the ego of doing something like this, sorry, the ambition and ego of doing something like this is, is, is pretty exciting. and to see it in the flesh, you know, in person would be. It's just a, it's a, it's a, it's something that's hard to describe. I mean, I got, I was fortunate to go with em to, to London. and, and, and that trip with her was, was super special. and, you know, for a lot of reasons, but it, it, I think it was, you know, her first trip to Europe, but seeing an, An artist that I've admired, for so, so long. And to finally see, I've seen their work in museums before you know, of the ones that they had sold to, to finance projects. And I'd seen documentaries, it's very, very familiar with their work, but never having really seen one and experienced when real life I thought I'd go and see the gates in New York and didn't get there. and you know, there was a project in Colorado that, that may or may not happen still. but going to Hyde park in London and seeing, you know, seeing a project that I really wasn't as familiar with frankly, was, was pretty exciting. And it was just, it was a beautiful trip and knew this one was coming hot on the heels of that and thought that I might be able to make another. European trip and vacation, you know, with, with my daughter and, and see this. But, some, and this project actually was delayed. And so when you bring up Matt in our conversation with. I know that he was planning a trip to Paris to try and see it on its last go round. The last time it was, we thought that it would, we're going to get it. Right. Right, right. And so I don't know if he's made the trip. That would be interesting to find out. We'll find out probably after we post this. but, I'm, I'm, I'm curious if any of our friends actually get there to see it. Cause, you know, cause the windows of time for these projects are relatively small and I think that that's. that, that sort of makes it a little bit more special and we're not going to talk about NFTs. so, but this is, this, this is crystal was the original NFT. yeah. So,

Kurt Neiswender:

yeah, that's it interesting. I mean, I, I know so little about that stuff, so I'm not even going to go there, but, Yeah, I do. Well, I wonder how long it will be up. I wonder. And I do. I was, I was also wondering what Matt, if Matt and his wife were. Make the trip again, right? We're we're now still in the midst of a pandemic. And actually, I don't know if, Europe is allowing Americans to go there at the moment. So I believe,

Jamie Crawley:

yeah, I believe, France is you have to be fully. okay, so for entry, but,

Kurt Neiswender:

levels of,

Jamie Crawley:

so yeah, definitely, definitely. you know, it's still a difficult time for a lot of folks to travel. and you know, but the fact that this is out in, in the real world is, is pretty fantastic.

Kurt Neiswender:

you know, and,

Jamie Crawley:

and fabric is really hard to draw. I'll just say that just like me complaining about water fabric. I'm on the same level

Kurt Neiswender:

increases and yeah, the multitude of, shade and shadow that, that can come out of a curving or a pleaded piece of fabric or

Jamie Crawley:

something. I mean, if anyone has ever taken like a, an intro drawing course, and the instructor takes a piece of paper and crumbles it and throws it on the desk and makes you try and draw that shading, shade and shadow, and form. I think that whole exercise, you know, there's probably somebody there's a written sort of a, a treatise on, on how that's either discouraged so many artists or, or created masterminds, like, Christo and Jean-Claude, you know, for projects like this. So,

Kurt Neiswender:

yeah, it's true. I mean, you know, a lot of, a lot of their work, starts off like a sketch as well. And so, you know, They're doing their best to render the reality that they intend to have. And, so that they can help promote, you know, the, adoption of the project, right. To the proposal, right. The acceptance of the proposal or proposed project. So, but I think you do, I mean, I don't don't knock your own work, man. This stuff is now this is a great sketch. Cause you have, you know, The rendering of the fabric, but also, you know, utilizing vertical lines that kind of hinted sky beyond. And, and, and I love how you, silhouetted either. Would those be clouds or. Tree

Jamie Crawley:

tree tree at the ground plane and then clouds in the sky. Yeah,

Kurt Neiswender:

yeah, yeah. Which is nice texture. I'm going to, I'm going to start showing my students in a teaching, you know, a second year studio and I want them to start seeing a little more sketching. And so I'm going to start sharing your stuff. Well,

Jamie Crawley:

that's very flattering. and makes me think, you know, that maybe there's some, maybe there's a reason why I got asked to, to, to teach it, Session at our state architecture convention as a pre-convention workshop. That's right. but no, it's true. I mean, it it's, I think that there's, there's training in what we do and there's training and art and rendering things. and there's certainly some very, very talented people out there, I think, but it's, it's how it gets applied and sort of the decision-making And, and like you're saying about their processes, artists, recognizing that they've got to create this wonder and excitement and this, this, provocation, you know, w what does it look like to wrap a building that everybody knows, or an architecture feature that everybody knows? How does it get transformed? and what does it look like to have fabric kind of laying across the body? You know, the body being the architecture. and, and sort of what does that do? It's, it's very figural. you know, there's a figure drawing aspect to it that I kind of love. and so, you know, for me, it, it's, it's a lot of different things that sort of all intersect, and I've just always sort of enjoyed their work and kind of love it.

Kurt Neiswender:

And then, and then like, Yeah. From sketch to reality, right? Yeah. And then

Jamie Crawley:

pulling it. Yeah. You got to pull it off. I mean, you, you know, you know, that's the whole thing. That's the trick that we all want to do

Kurt Neiswender:

with all of our work. We'll have to, we'll have there's another, side by side. comparison episode that we could probably do in the future, but I'm not, I'm not ready yet. I'll I'll I'll let you know. I'll talk, we'll talk about off, off the, off the record.

Jamie Crawley:

I love those little subtle asides. I mean, NC pro

Kurt Neiswender:

so well was one thing I wanted to add before we, we, we had some, something special to wrap up on, but. I also wanted to talk about this sketch too, because it kind of reminds me of, Danielle's, clear obsession with all things French right now. And so,

Jamie Crawley:

you know, she's, are you planning a trip? Is that, what is that? Does that, or is that, or is that the crescendo of all this, all things French? Oh,

Kurt Neiswender:

no, actually, yeah, we will actually, we are going to start saving up to go out. I think we're, it might be a little while till it actually happens. Cause we're going to try and, take, her niece who will be graduating high school and, kind of turn it into an event around that. so it might be a couple of years, but it gives us plenty of time to learn French, which is what Danielle is doing right now. She's trying to learn French. Oh, wow. Yeah, brush up on some, some French, but we're eating a little more French food. there's a great bakery in a, so now that I have to drive to campus, there's a great bakery in, in, on the way, like close to close to campus that is owned by two French people shape here at it. Genevieve. Bakery or why they wouldn't call it bakery. What's what's the French patisserie or, and so I pick up Danielle is going

Jamie Crawley:

to be doing all the speaking on your trip. Is that basically like,

Kurt Neiswender:

well, you know, I mean at first, yes, the majority, I don't want to rely on her, but then, so we're getting baguettes and some sourdough and the cool part is they import all their flowers. From France. Oh, really? So they they're utilizing, you know, ingredients that you can't get here otherwise, so, well, you might be able to find it, but, you know, I don't know. It's probably very difficult.

Jamie Crawley:

Well, and it's, and it's, it's funny, you mentioned that is that I was, I was talking to somebody recently about, and this is sort of an, in a baking kind of vibe, but. People who are from other places, even those of us, who've sort of, you don't realize that we're from somewhere else. but the, I have really strong memories of when my grandparents would come and stay with us for, you know, a month or two. And one of the things was, there was always one extra piece of luggage that was full of ingredients, typically that were only kidding. Like things that you could only get in Canada, that my mom wasn't able to get wherever we happen to be living in the U S at the time. And so they were just, you know, certain things that she had sort of grown up accustomed to using in the kitchen. And my grandmother would always make sure that, you know, she would. Kind of get the list and, and, and then have a few little extra treats in there for me and, you know, but yeah, I mean, and I think that that own a lot of folks, I mean, when they, when they think back on their childhood or kind of growing up or their families, you know, especially if you have relatives from, from other countries or they themselves are from other countries that there is at the beginning, I think that, That sort of sharing and cooking and that sort of ingredient. I mean, w we certainly live in a much more different world now where there's a lot of access to some of those things, but there's still, you know, certain ways of doing things that I think is sort of, you know, the making of it. and some of those sort of ingredient stories are sort of fun. So to hear that they're doing something like that, there's an authenticity that, that, you can kind of appreciate.

Kurt Neiswender:

Oh yeah. And it. So good. All right. So we should talk about Batman real quick. That was the perfect segue. Perfect segue to the, to the, yeah. So lastly, let's, let's just talk about Batman, right? So there's a new Batman on

Jamie Crawley:

its way. Yeah. I mean, do we need to say anything more other than it's Batman day? and. So that means a Batman sketch and, and this one is just the bat and the cat and that's that's, that's

Kurt Neiswender:

all I've got. That's true. It's not much left to say, but although it is a nice sketch and I did watch the latest trailer, which is just so, so good. So intriguing. I was a little skeptical at first. When I heard now, before all this, and they announced that it was going to be Robert Pattinson. You know, I mean, the only other thing I remember is, you know, the Twilight stuff, Bruce Wayne, Batman, it's looking pretty good from what I can tell so far.

Jamie Crawley:

Yeah, I, and I, and I'll just say that there probably will be some more Batman sketches, but I'm definitely, definitely had to get, get one in on, on Batman

Kurt Neiswender:

day. Yeah, no thanks. And I, you know, it's not, it's not, overlooked on my end slate, you know, that much. So I like to see him. Yeah. Very cool. Anyway. Thanks, Jamie. That's good. It's a good tour that you just gave me from Bucky to a Batman.

Jamie Crawley:

Bucky to Batman. Here we go. Thanks Kurt. Oh, wait. Oh.