Coffee Sketch Podcast

101 - Space the Final Frontier

September 08, 2022 Kurt Neiswender/Jamie Crawley Season 4 Episode 101
Coffee Sketch Podcast
101 - Space the Final Frontier
Show Notes Transcript

Thank you for listening. We both hope that you enjoyed this episode of Coffee Sketch Podcast. Our Theme music is provided by my brother who goes by @c_0ldfashioned on Instagram and Twitter. Our podcast is hosted at coffeesketchpodcast.com find more show notes and information from this episode. And finally, if you liked this episode please rate us on iTunes and share us with your friends! Thank you!


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Kurt:

Hello, Jamie, what's new

Jamie:

Kurt. Well, I I've, I have learned for the, for the listeners, that Kurt has like, a couple different ways that he gets, queued up and keyed up for like, Each episode. and the one that I hadn't seen in a long time, but I particularly enjoy is when he kind of goes metal on me and starts to, yeah.

Kurt:

I, I like, I like a good, like a good metal song every now and then, but, yeah. Yeah. I it's, it's the curve balls that. The wild, you

Jamie:

know, you've, and, and you were telling me in the warmup too, that you, you, almost were dabbling in, since we hadn't done an episode in a while, you were sort of thinking about our, our secret other podcast, of Jamie and Kirk, talk about baseball and that's right.

Kurt:

Yeah, it it's a rabbit hole that, yeah, but might, might

Jamie:

our love of teams that do not exist anymore and, reminiscing about little, little league and, days at the ballpark.

Kurt:

Yeah. Well, I, I, I don't know if you want me to get, talk, talk about it, but the, I was, I was kind of talking about this bobblehead that I got, and then we talked about. Minor league baseball teams. And then, so I went to a minor league baseball game. I bought a hat cuz their logos are always pretty cool. And hold on a sec here. Now I'm getting of course interruptions from Danielle. She just started calling and now, I'll have to cut this part out. That gives me more work to do. and so let's see if that you wanna just start over, keeps it at bay. You okay? No, that's fine. It's like, yeah, I have to cut rhubarb out of the yard. So like it's like, great. Let's talk about bobbleheads, but anyway, let's see. So I'll just start like up again and say, so I. Was it, at the Lansing lug nets baseball game. And we were talking about,

Jamie:

well, love lower division team names. yeah. And, and, I mean, and I, I don't say that like in a, like a, a teasing sort of way, I just think it's just, there's the level of personality and passion that, that both the franchises, as well as the fans have for the sport and the players that are. on the pitch or, mm-hmm, on the, on the baseball diamond or, soccer feels the same way for me, we've talked about our, our Flint city bucks, mm-hmm

Kurt:

Hey, they're in the, they're in the playoffs again.

Jamie:

Sweet, sweet.

Kurt:

Speaking of which, but yeah. Yeah. The, laning Lu nuts, which is really cool. And, cool name, cool logo. So I bought the hat. I should have brought the hat out, but, and actually there in Michigan, I think there's like the traverse city beach bombs or something like that, which so my point was, our, our, secret podcast should probably be something like let's start collecting all the minor league baseball hats. There's a lot. I was Googling there's a lot. Yeah. There's actually, and there's apparently the minor league teams have like these, like they had like the Latin American league or this sort of like, Doppel, it's not, it's not a doppelganger, but it's like an alternative, mascot, some of them. So Lansing lug knots has the, the logos. I forget the full name, but basically they have another hat that you can buy that has this crazy, like bird on the front. I mean, and this color scheme, like it's teal and yellow. I mean, it's this loud color scheme. And then, so they have this, the Lu nuts hat and then the logos. And I was like, oh my gosh, I really want this, this Locos hat too. But I didn't wanna shell out, Well, that's what I'm saying

Jamie:

is like, minor, minor league baseball and, lower division soccer. And I don't mean lower as in like, poor. I just mean, it's not, it's minor league. Yeah. It's minor league, minor league for soccer. some of them have the most amazing jerseys, and sort of fan experiences. I, I, I'll share this and then we can probably, get to the, get to the coffee, or it might seem like we're totally jacked on coffee right now. but, I, I just heard about this team it's in. I wanna say it's in England, like a lower division, but it might be Scotland. and someone was Des I haven't seen it. I need to go and find it like a, an image of this, but someone was describing it as, this team has a new kit, a New Jersey, and they have apparently modeled it after some kind of mascot. When you said mascot, it made me think of it that they have, and the mascot is. The way they describe it is like, if like Lisa Simpson was like on like a CRA, like, like had been melted and sort of stretched and was wearing a kilt, apparently they've put that on a Jersey, which just sounds totally insane. and so there's, 11. Guys running around a soccer field, with, a melted Lisa Simpson and a kilt on their chest. It really seems totally ridiculous, but why

Kurt:

not? Yeah. I'm gonna have to look that up too. Yeah. anyway, so, I, yeah, we, we can go on, we should probably dedicate maybe a. A whole other hour to graphic

Jamie:

design gone wrong.

Kurt:

Oh yeah. I, I believe, 99% invisible has covered stuff like that, on their own. So, Hey, we can either recommend people to them or we can do another one ourselves. Right. So, for coffee and we, we, we can quickly dive into that. I'm. Sticking with my local guys. And I've got the, it's called the Berry kiss. I've had it before. We've talked about it before, but I, I think it's becoming as much as I love damn fine cup of coffee for its, reference to, twin peaks. Their, their kiss. One is a nice light roast that has a nice sort of fruit fruited. Aroma, it, it kind of has this Berry flavoring. I mean, it's not flavored, but it has, it just has this nice sort of sweet and, fruity, note, note to the, to the scent. So it's nice. I like it. Cool. Very cool. And, and so what about you it's oh, it's it's,

Jamie:

we're still doing dark roast, black dark

Kurt:

roast. black is. Yeah, well, it can't yeah, can't go wrong. Yeah. With a little, with a nice, good dark roast. So, so let's, let's jump in. There was a couple of points that we wanted to make on, on a new sketch. Do you wanna share? You had, and you wanted to share something first, but you wanna talk about sketch and then go to the yeah. Yeah.

Jamie:

Well, I think you. you, you, you had a, immediate love for the sketch and kind of prompted sort of an interesting conversation. and I, I, this is one of those ones that just sort of, I, I, I almost refer to it as a warmup sketch, because it's one where. similar to ones I've described in the past where I don't have a, I'm not necessarily looking at an object or a place or a space. this is just trying to empty your thoughts. Mm-hmm and kind of let yourself, kind of almost have a, an automatic drawing in a sense, and then sort of see where it leads. but then as that drawing starts to come out on the page, you just sort of, I'm lefthanded. So I see my right hand and I start to draw my right hand and kind of weave that into, this sort of, grappling at space and thoughts and. And I think that that maybe was, something that you saw and, reacted to in a different way, but I appreciated your reaction and, I'll, I'll, I'll take it. So

Kurt:

yeah, sure. it's funny. Well, I think this landed online about the same day or same time that I, Danielle and I went to our local planetarium, which we, when we were there. They did brag and say that it is the largest planetarium in the state of Michigan. So we're lucky cuz it's, it's like we could walk there, although on a super hot day we did not walk. We drove, but it's very close to our house and it's part of the Flint cultural center. And so it's always fun to, to, to go to the planetarium, but we went specifically for, they had a showing where they, The presenter or the staff person, I don't know, or planetarium dome scientist, talked about the new images from the web telescope. And we had talked about the web, a while back. I forget what episode, in, in how it was preparing to launch. And so now that we've gotten some of the first images out of it, even though your explanation of the sketch, doesn't have really. A, a direct connection to outer space or anything, but it did kind of strike me as like a little bit of like this, this, well, the hand, but it's also like kind of a space suit, the abstract elements around it, but then, the, the, the sort of, playing with different scale, right. You have the hand and then you have these objects, like, the, the perspective kind. Punch through the hand. And then on top of the hand, and these sort of random elements kind of gave me like a Kubrick, like space Odyssey, futuristic abstraction of, of what outer space, could be. And this's a thing like with, with seeing the web images is. How does a, a human brain wrap your head around the, the vastness of the universe. And they explain that, with the telescope, we can see now 13. So the, what is theorized, or I don't know how they measure it, but they basically say that the, the universe is 13.8 billion light years. Big and continually expanding. And so the huble can reach 13.1 billion light years with its distance. And the web now can do th they have. Measured, but it can do 13.3 billion light years. So even though it's 0.2 to 0.1 to 0.3 billion, light years difference between Hubble and web in science terms, that's a massive improvement and that's a big like leap forward to being able to, because what they noticed. And I think the image that you were talking about off, off camera or whatever we wanna call it, They were, or there was a couple of images that, that, well, that have come out, but they, at first thought there was like a, a, a fault like in the camera, but the, because there was this like streak in the, in one of the images that they're looking at. And then they realized that no, it's the fact that the camera's even better than they expected and can actually see farther away or fainter and farther object. Then they thought they could see or thought they were gonna get. So it's pretty fascinating. And then they went into all this. The science of how there, we, we, we talk about, I talk about this in my acoustics and lighting class. We talk about the visible light spectrum, the electromagnetic spectrum, the broader spectrum. And we can only see with our human eye, a very small sliver and the hub and the web are, are tipped toward early infrared and mid INFR. So beyond the visible light spectrum that our eye can see. And so the images that they take and I'm all really, I, hopefully, I sound as amped up as I am. Stuff is so fascinating, but they, they basically have to filter the images. So if, what if we looked at the raw image, we would either see nothing or like this. Gray splash or whatever, cuz our eye can't see the thing. So they, they put, they cast filters on it to sort of scale it back to the RG RGB or the Rog BI the, the rainbow of colors that we can see so that we can actually assess, so we can. Probably more the lay person like us can understand, comprehend something, comprehend what the heck it is. Right. But then the CR so then it's like, it's like, it's kind of like looking at the matrix. So the scientists are looking at the data from the camera more so than the actual image cuz so then they can tab, they can use the data from the, the infrared spectrums that, that. The frequencies in the electromagnetic F range that they're getting and compare the data points across images. So that's like, to me, like looking at the matrix, like they're not looking at images anymore, they're just looking at data and reading, visualizing it in a whole other anyway. So it's, it's, it's pretty fascinating. And then, so they casted on the big planetarium, dome and zoom in on parts, and they talked about. The, the cool thing with the web is they will be, or maybe there's another camera. but the, you can download these images that are. Billions of pixels millions, billions of pixels, large. I mean, they'll fill up your hard drive probably but then you could zoom in zoom in zoom in and see all this detail. So anyways, it was so this, I think it was like the same day that you made the sketch. And I was like, Hey, we gotta talk about the web. no, absolutely.

Jamie:

Let, let's pull up an image of it while we're, while we're

Kurt:

chatting here. Do you, do you have it ready? I think, I've got it ready. And, and I, we were trying to keep this short and I just kind of blabbed through it, but Hey, we'll, change gears to the, to your image. And, and so that, while you're pulling that up, it's just really, interesting to see what we've gotten out of the, the camera. So this is, I think one of the first ones that they, oh, that's the first image. It says there. Which everything in that image basically is another galaxy, which is kind of just, I don't know. I just can't even fathom. Oh, you want, you wanna know one fun fact is the, are you listening? Yes, so you see how the, like, this it's

Jamie:

on. Is this on.

Kurt:

Is you see, you see how the, the, the sort of glare from the, the sort of starlike object in the middle there. Yeah. Yeah. Those are the ones

Jamie:

that are

Kurt:

closer to us. The fact that it's hexagonal is due to the shape of the mirror on wet. Right? So it's a, it's a, a fault, so to speak. Based on how the image is being captured. So there the lens, it's still a camera. It has to fo focus light and into, the, the lens of the, the O the camera and our reflector on the web happens to be a hexagonal sort of honeycomb construction, which then will make that sort of defect. Whereas the Hubble is, squareish so it'll be like four points. So we have six points. So I thought that was kind of interesting. So the, the planetary Nebula, this was cool. And they realized that I don't know if they, if they, if you have the, a different version of this image, but there's a, there's actually like two galaxies or two stars, I believe in the center of, or two galaxies. I'm gonna forget. But so in the center, it's not actually one, but there's two galaxies. That are really close to each other, so, oh yeah. And that's the, what's the name of that? The Karina Nebula. Yeah, that thing so cool. It's just crazy. Yeah. It's fascinating. Clouds of dust and all those dust get compressed into stars. Like they generate, as they condense that, the mass then becomes a star and.

Jamie:

yeah, so no, that's yeah, no, I, I mean, it's, it's one that, I mean, it's a topic you and I have talked about quite a bit. I mean, and it's, we've had a couple different episodes that have sort of, leaned into that and, I was, I was excited. when the, the images dropped, I I've been, I have the app on my phone that sort of tracked web's progress as it went out to. it's stationary orbit, which just like the physics of that is

Kurt:

just, it's like a, I think they said it's a hundred million miles away. It's

Jamie:

just crazy. and,

Kurt:

how do you control something? A hundred million? It's like, whatever

Jamie:

yeah. Well, I mean it's math, right? yeah, but yeah, it's, it's, it's amazing. And, and, and I think I had shared, in, like you said, in one of those previous episodes, we were talking about it. there's a great sort of space space, man, sketch, when, when web launched mm-hmm that I had done and we, we sort of chatted. But, yeah, there was a, there was a moment. gosh, it's probably like 10 years ago now, where NASA was, had a, a two scale mockup of the web telescope that they were shuttling around the us to, different festivals and different events, really to, to celebrate what they're doing, but also. Kind of the excitement that you were just talking about and, and expressing for everybody of, the wonder and. The, the, the imagination that sort of is involved in this for folks who, these types of endeavors, I mean, it's science, it's, it's wonder it's a, it's, it's creativity. And so, Emma and I were able to, to go and, and see that, I was actually stopped by south by Southwest. festival, they had it here in Austin and, or had the web, the web telescope here in Austin to kind of show it off and show the scale of it. And, had a bunch of NASA scientists and engineers kind of talking to adults, kids, anybody who would listen, about this amazing mission, that now has been realized. And we're all getting to see the fruits of that labor. And, it, it's pretty exciting. Yeah.

Kurt:

There's I mean, we could go on, well, even what I learned in like a half an hour, but you could go on and on forever about it, just so, so fascinating. But yeah. Well, thanks for, inspiring an interesting conversation. Really? Absolutely.

Jamie:

Absolutely.