Coffee Sketch Podcast

098 - Happy Birthday, Kurt!

April 11, 2022 Kurt Neiswender/Jamie Crawley Season 4 Episode 98
Coffee Sketch Podcast
098 - Happy Birthday, Kurt!
Show Notes Transcript

Thank you for listening. We both hope that you enjoyed this episode of Coffee Sketch Podcast. Our Theme music is provided by my brother who goes by @c_0ldfashioned on Instagram and Twitter. Our podcast is hosted at coffeesketchpodcast.com find more show notes and information from this episode. And finally, if you liked this episode please rate us on iTunes and share us with your friends! Thank you!

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Music on the Show

CNEIS - https://cneis.bandcamp.com/

c_0ldfashioned - https://www.instagram.com/c_0ldfashioned/ 

Compilation - https://triplicaterecords.bandcamp.com/track/cneis-more-or-less 

Our Links

Follow Jamie on Instagram  - https://www.instagram.com/falloutstudio/ 

Follow Kurt on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/kurtneiswender/ 

Kurt’s Practice - https://www.instagram.com/urbancolabarchitecture/ 

Coffee Sketch on Twitter - https://twitter.com/coffeesketch 

Jamie on Twitter - https://twitter.com/falloutstudio 

Kurt on Twitter - https://twitter.com/kurtneiswender 

On the Web

Website - www.coffeesketchpodcast.com

Kurt’s Practice - www.urbancolab.design 

Contact Me - info@urbancolab.design 

NFT Artwork - https://hicetnunc.art/urbancolab 

Coffee Sketch Podcast is on YouTube for extended cuts and more visual content of Jamie’s beautiful sketches. Please consider subscribing!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_lQkY3-OqmHaTl_jdOgtvw 

Kurt’s Practice Urban Colab Architecture, shares about the practice of architecture and is also on YouTube. Please Subscribe to: 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuMXvvQXgrQIVE1uJ8QHxsw 

Support the show

Buy us a Coffee! Support the Show!

https://www.buymeacoffee.com/coffeesketch

Our Links

Follow Jamie on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/falloutstudio/

Follow Kurt on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/kurtneiswender/

Kurt’s Practice - https://www.instagram.com/urbancolabarchitecture/

Coffee Sketch on Twitter - https://twitter.com/coffeesketch

Jamie on Twitter - https://twitter.com/falloutstudio

Kurt on Twitter - https://twitter.com/kurtneiswender

Kurt Neiswender:

Hey, Jamie, how you doing? Good. How are you? Kurt? Well, we've had a little hiatus, however, it's still cold in Michigan.

Jamie:

Yeah. Not cold here, but I see you have a nice scarf.

Kurt Neiswender:

I do. Thanks to you. I've got my, my beautiful Verde Verde on Austin football club. Yeah. It's spring by the terms of the calendar, but it's not really that warm here in Michigan. I don't know what I mean. I think for you down south, it gets. Before this, but, so here's what happens in Michigan pretty much every year. So before the spring, right, the 21st or 22nd of March, we'll get a nice weekend. And we're like all hopeful, Oh God, I actually went me and Danielle went out into the yard and started moving some garden stuff around.

Jamie:

You're

Kurt Neiswender:

thinking, shoveling things like that. That was two weeks ago. And ever since then, it's been an uncomfortably Chile windy actually last weekend, this past weekend, snow, both Saturday nights.

Jamie:

Yeah, which not, not snow here, which

Kurt Neiswender:

would put a damper on all the, all the attitudes.

Jamie:

Oh, I totally imagined it would. I mean, I mean, yeah. You're,

Kurt Neiswender:

we're so, we get to this point, we're, we're at the brink of like transition change, seasonal change, Vivaldi four seasons, right. And we're not, we're not there yet. We're still waiting for that change in season. Is that too far of a stretch? The Vivaldi?

Jamie:

I wasn't sure where you were going, but you don't have sometimes, sometimes, I mean, I do know that you have an affinity for the chamber music. So, and we were talking about museums a little while ago, so, I. I I get it. I see, I see how you got there.

Kurt Neiswender:

Well, I think more people under no, the Vivaldi four seasons than, than they know, what it's

Jamie:

called. Well, I think they know that because of bugs bunny.

Kurt Neiswender:

Yeah. Hey, whatever vehicle gets gets the

Jamie:

point of the medium and the medium is the message.

Kurt Neiswender:

Speaking of. So you, you, you, took advantage of our, our shared account coffee, sketch Twitter account and posted some, some, some passes, I guess, what, what Kurt's been doing in his pastime, which is testing out technology, different media. And that is, I don't know if this is going to come up very well, but like

Jamie:

print.

Kurt Neiswender:

Yeah, 3d print. So I bought a 3d printer. Here's here's the thing, now that I'm teaching is there's a cat over there. Yeah. I've got an owl, so Al versus cat. So, so I, I teach, right. So, so another faculty member said to the students like, oh, so there, I don't know if you have a Microsoft. I don't know if it's that widespread. It's like a computer store right here in Michigan.

Jamie:

Those things still exist. Yeah.

Kurt Neiswender:

Yeah. I mean, so there's one right called micro center.

Jamie:

And is it like right next to radio shack?

Kurt Neiswender:

No, I don't think a radio check could compete with micro center. So micro center is as big as like a Walmart, but

Jamie:

just for tech stuff. And it feels like. Like you're in stranger things like when you walk

Kurt Neiswender:

in there. Oh yeah, yeah. There's a whole section on like, they call it maker stuff, but it's like what you would have found in a RadioShack, right? Like soldering kits and diodes and chips and, floppy

Jamie:

disks.

Kurt Neiswender:

that's another thing. It's another aside, trying to explain to my students what a floppy disc is, but, it's funny, actually.

Jamie:

I know, I know birthday's coming up. So you're just sort of like, for everybody who's like still with us at this point in this episode there, Kurt is feeling a little older, so

Kurt Neiswender:

yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. So I, so I met micro center and so they have a 3d printer that is normally 1 99. So

Jamie:

hold on, Kurt got in his DeLorean and like drove to Microsoft.

Kurt Neiswender:

Okay, keep going. Yep. Yep. Yep. And, so it's normally 1 99 online coupon, half off. So $99 a 3d printer, an ender three pro 3d printer, which made this owl and a few other things

Jamie:

I've got. That's a pretty great test print. I mean, for, I mean, if, if I opened up the, the box and they were like, okay, here, here's some things that you can use to test print, pick one. And one of them happens to be an owl. I'm thinking that David Lynch's like, entered the, the chat. So that's pretty great. And

Kurt Neiswender:

thank God it worked. So maybe there is an owl or two for you and Jason. Oh, shit. Sorry. Pardon me? I dropped my L I'll put it down now, before I throw it around the microphone, maybe an owl or two may find their way over to you. So anyway, so actually that brought up another fun story with the students and I'll, I'll, I'll turn it over to you in a second here, but the, oh, so we're going on a field trip very soon. Right? So this weekend we're going to Cincinnati and I was trying to explain to students how, when I was a student and I think you would probably relate to this is I enjoy. Visiting other cities once becoming an architecture student to then try and track down particular buildings of note in these new cities. Oh, absolutely. And then, so then I was trying to explain this, this, sort of mindset to my current students. And so. we did all this, before Google maps existed and Google earth Google all together. And they were like, oh, totally forgot. That was the thing that didn't exist. When you were a student, how did you do it? And I was like, well, so before Google maps existed, we had things called maps. Paper maps, how to get to, to place the place and word of mouth. I mean, you basically would take someone, someone who had been there, you find, and they would tell you like, okay, turn left, turn right, turn off. and then you'd find so-and-so's project, building project to house or whatever, Frank Lloyd Wright, or, for us, like on the west coast, Frank, Gary, or, something like. MorphoSys whatever, for the California stuff. so I don't know. I mean, does that resonate with you? The absolutely urban, urban hearing

Jamie:

explorations? Well, and, and even just, I think for, when you, when you go to school in Texas in a relatively small college town, where the university is like, the big thing, the opportunity to get out and about, fair. There's my Canadian, out and about, into the bigger cities, just even in Texas. Yeah. The field trip, first of all, it's, of course with professors, but then it's, the opportunity to kind of go out and explore and, you're, you're reading about. particular projects, especially ones that are relatively new and you see them in a magazine or, somebody else has, has, like you said, in there, And said, oh, well you have to go. And, it's, that sort of urban exploration, or suburban or, or rural, as the case may be, I think is, is pretty, pretty remarkable. I mean, lake Frito's early work, here in Texas was something that we would often try and go and find. yeah, I mean, and, and, we're fortunate that Texas driving distances, people would go to Houston and Dallas and San Antonio and Austin Fort worth, to, to go find, projects and you in big cities as well, especially as new things kind of came online, but, travel, I mean, study abroad, just, vacations trips like that, it's just starts to become something that you've kind of got a. always a running list of, of places, not just places you'd like to visit, but when, when you're there and enjoying, dinner out with friends, oh, well, there's this one building I want to kind of sneak over and take a peek at.

Kurt Neiswender:

Good. Well, I'm glad I'm not the only one. I didn't think I was the only one I knew I would have. I had a feeling you would agree. Although I do feel like these, this generation of students are not necessarily, they're not quite there yet. I don't know. There's this sort of digitization, like the fact that they can see, they can see so much online, keeps them from. Being as curious, but I tried to explain to them, like the photo of the building that you're going to see is like this perfect shot, but understanding a building from turning that corner that you can't see is where you start to understand how, as an architect, you have to develop the full picture. Like you're, you're designing an entire. Working structure. Right? So what's behind the corner. what I mean? That is not

Jamie:

absolutely. I mean, it was it's it's experiencing the place. and, and I, I think you're right. I think there is, all of us, I mean, our ourselves included, there's, you get a new project. I mean, we get new projects and we can't necessarily always go Steve them, but, you can. you you're on the phone with somebody and you have the ability to pull it up on your laptop or your computer. And you can see the site that they're talking about. it, it might not be the most current photo, but you can, effectively drive around and kind of, not just see the particular project site, because someone sent you a photo or you can pull it up, but you can actually sort of drive around and see, the neighborhood a little bit. So that sense of discovery. Only could happen before by going there. that experience has changed. I mean, it's, I know it's changed for me and, but what's funny is the ex the literal experience of a place as a designer. I mean, I'm not just talking about, as, as a, as a person, going somewhere to visit, but as a designer, I, I personally still can see the market difference in my perception of a particular place in project when I haven't been there. And when I have been there, and even in my sort of creative process, my interest level is much higher. My, my instincts are sharper. ideas are. Much more elaborate and, the not, not elaborate, isn't even the right word. I think they're just, they're, they're richer as, as concepts. and I think a lot of that has to do with you're, you're really connecting with the subject matter. and, and it's not that the, it's not that the other work is any less valuable, but it it's certainly not. and, and what it makes me think of, not to belabor the point, but when you're talking about architectural works that are published and that perfect shot or something like that, and kind of the artificialness of it. I have talked to Sterling, Sterling wants to Sterling Sterling will join us on the podcast. I mean, cause architectural photographer, quite talented, with that architecture background as well. one thing that I thought of, when I see those, when you're saying that when I'm thinking of those architecture photos is, w one of my professors, my mentor, when he was reviewing works as sort of an architectural critic, he always made the point that I'm not going to really pass judgment on a project until I actually go and see it. Yup. no matter how many times somebody sends me, here's, 10 photos and the floor plans and the whole bit, and I could read the plan and, just like anybody else, the experience of the place, that walking around the detail that you're talking about, really seeing it executed, in, in three dimensions, her really makes, makes a difference and then. How buildings age, or how places age, if you kind of go back to work, that you, maybe didn't get to see in their first run, but you get to see them, 10, 15 years later, and you were, a big fan when it first came out, but didn't get to see it. And then you get, you finally do, what's your impression of the place then? does it hold up, do the ideas, the concepts hold up or, or were they trendy? yeah, so I think all those things become really valuable and, I, I think that. you're maybe being a little too critical your students, but maybe, maybe you'll have a different, a different view after your field trip. I mean, I've never been to Cincinnati. I, I definitely would like to go. of course I have one building that I would love for you to go and see. it's the only Zahara project, in Cincy, for a long, for a long time, it was the only Zoho project in the United States. Right.

Kurt Neiswender:

So, oh, it's on my list. It's yeah. Hi. For sure. And we will be in the

Jamie:

vicinity for sure. I mean that floor plane that becomes wall

Kurt Neiswender:

and the interior stairs. Yeah. Yeah. We're we're, we're, we're going, I've, I've been actually touting or promoting to the students as this is the first Zaha building in America for a long time, for a very long time. And actually, I didn't mention the, the H. aspect to it just yesterday when I was in class, cause that's the last time I'll see them until this tomorrow. tomorrow night. So, yeah, I, I appreciate that. It sort of reinforces a lot of the same thoughts that I had in my mind. So that's, that's been very fun. Yes. I, I will not pass judgment on my students yet. No, I think, there's there's still quite a few that are, I it's, it's really, it's one of those things. When it sounds like a generalization, when I try and blanketly sort of say these things, it's not necessarily true, there's, there's always still a range of, of reactions that, that you get, from super interest to, to ma medium to lower and all that stuff. Well,

Jamie:

I'll say, here, as you're saying that, and not passing judgment, we've talked a little bit about. how we all got into architecture and, kind of, our different viewpoints about it along the way and how we're still, jaded at times. but it is sometimes fun to look back and, my, my literal first field trip in architecture school was to the Kimball. So after that, It's like,

Kurt Neiswender:

actually it's kind of interesting is that on the west coast, I do remember, distinctly a field trip and we went to the salt among, well, we also went to the neurosciences building, which is Todd Williams, Billy sent. Right. So, I mean, on top of which is also in the San Diego area, but I mean, That's pretty good know. Right. But the salt, I don't know if you've made it to the salt Institute in person. I've

Jamie:

not, I've not it's, it is still one of the ones on my list.

Kurt Neiswender:

No, I've not made it to the Kimball. And hopefully soon I can tell,

Jamie:

and, and, having experienced con you have, and, and I, as well, the thing that, that Kimball trip was. when you talk about experiencing a place and not just in photos or a plan or something like that, it's of course we had studied it, in our architecture survey class and all that stuff, but what was interesting and, and, and we even knew this, that there's some, different ways to approach the building. and. The thing that our professor, was, trying to show us was kind of his favorite approach, some of his favorite spaces, And so it there's a personalization of it, And at that point, I think that that's where, everything becomes more human. and. and even in those moments where you're, being criticized or, that the work is really critical or, this line, isn't the light right line weight and all that other garbage, when you also have the, the, the parallel experience of walking around a site and seeing how your classmates, your professor are interacting with the space and then having conversations about. and then recognizing that this is a masterwork, is, is, is pretty influential. at the time I knew it was influential and I knew it was important, but kind of looking back at it and having the opportunity to do that, I think also is sort of valuable to, that introspection, not everybody has it in the same way or accesses it the same way, but. that's why I say, give your students, give them, cut them, cut them a little slack. So,

Kurt Neiswender:

well, we'll see, I mean this conversation, but actually it'd be very useful as, as we approach the weekend. Cause we'll be there so Friday, late afternoon, Sunday or Saturday all day, and then, Sunday morning. So there's like a nice span of time. We get. Yeah, thanks. I'm sure you'll, you maybe you'll see some, some snapshots of the, of the excursion

Jamie:

as sketches. I hope on some sketches. I

Kurt Neiswender:

hope actually speaking of which the other day, so I'm a pretty cool teacher, I think, and so a couple of weeks ago when things were relatively low, low key, As the kids like to say these days, they were like, oh, what's the name of the company that you have? And I was like, oh, and then they went to my website and they're like podcasts. I'm like, oh yeah, yeah. I have a podcast, And then I started telling them about Jamie's Facebook page and. Twitter and, and, think, my, most of the work is my friend Jamie's sketches that we talked about on the podcast. And then he started looking at your sketches. So you may have picked up a few followers from, that one day. I try not to talk about it too much, like during the semester. Cause I don't want it to be like, Big deal. Yeah. As, as things were on, get toward the end, then I can kind of kind of

Jamie:

slip in and

Kurt Neiswender:

I don't want to like, what do you, what's the word self aggrandized or promote?

Jamie:

Yeah. You like check out the right. Yeah.

Kurt Neiswender:

Listen to our podcast of may. So anyhow, so, I dunno, it is sometimes fun though. Cause it wasn't everybody. It was just like a few that were hanging around. Anyway. The ones that think I'm cool. Right? Oh, sorry. I was like, oh, you're like, oh, I'm okay. Yeah. Well the good part is I can, I can go. Wow. These aren't my drawings. These are Jamie.

Jamie:

Yeah. If you don't like this one it's Jamie's

Kurt Neiswender:

no, they all liked it. I bet. I bet there is maybe a little micro bump in, oh, follower, follower, attendees. all right, so thanks for the, fund interest. So my only. Well, hinted at coffee is over there. It's so far away. So this is my attempt at like a products

Jamie:

business,

Kurt Neiswender:

proper, proper decoration for at the moment this my studio called the studio. It's going to get painted. So although don't, don't get too alarmed, the th the walls are, or an old white paint in this old plaster

Jamie:

building. And they're going to get a new

Kurt Neiswender:

white paint. No, won't be white. I think it's a, it's a very light gray. Okay. Yeah. Noncommittal non-committal gray. I think it'll brighten it up a little bit. And so any who, so the trim Daniel did get the trim. You could see the trims nice and bright white. And, I have rootless our local roaster here has this limited edition and you can barely see it, but let's see if I can even get, I can't really get that the focus won't work, but it's a barrel aged bourbon barrel. limited edition roast

Jamie:

must

Kurt Neiswender:

smell amazing. It does smell. It's very, it does smell. No, it's very aromatic, super, super bourbony like eat before even grind it. And then when you grind it and then when you drink it, It has that flavor, that smell. And actually, so I pick all this stuff up at the Flint farmer's market locally here, and there's a little coffee stand in there called Penny's cafe. And if you, if you haven't followed them on Instagram it's it's Penny's cafe and, The number two there. So not the owner, but the number two, who I was talking to when I was buying this, she said, it's not something she drinks like every day, sort of like special occasion. And then we were just talking today about it. So I, I bought it yesterday. No, what day Tuesday, I went back there today on my way, picked up some fresh drip coffee on my way to a job site. And I said, Hey, yeah, I had some. Bourbon barrel aged stuff. And she said, and I was like, yeah, it's, it's definitely like, not it's, it's, it's super strong, like intense flavor. So it, I mean, for me, I could probably handle it more probably only because I it's the only coffee I have now. So I might

Jamie:

try some Bargo status.

Kurt Neiswender:

Because I'm cheap. No, don't so, but her opinion was that, it's a little more on the special occasion side, but we discovered we, we brainstormed today that maybe with a little, a little extra like rum chatter or, real booze in there with a copy might like make a tidy out of it. Kind of kind of

Jamie:

style. I mean, you've got the weather for that kind of stuff right

Kurt Neiswender:

now. So we still, we still have tidy weather. So because of that, it has that strong, like boozy bourbon, scent aroma to it, and then throw a little extra actually into it. So that's that's experiment number

two.

Jamie:

That's experiment, number two. Yeah. I, I ha I actually have the, local QA coffee, from here in Austin and this is their, that their espresso roast, right. Which is nice. It's actually, I mean, it sounds like it's a real dark roast, but I find it's it's, it's, it's a lot smoother. then the most of those kinds of espresso kind of, blends or something. So I, I, I it's one it's one of the ones I'd really liked from them

Kurt Neiswender:

is Kobe, the roaster,

Jamie:

who they

Kurt Neiswender:

is the roaster. Yeah. Okay. Cause you've mentioned you've, you've talked about them. They

Jamie:

also have, they actually have a, they actually have a shop as well. So you can, you can go in and. It's sort of set up almost like a co-work site. but, but the majority of their businesses, the roasting,

Kurt Neiswender:

oh, speaking of the row, our friends rootless finally got our permit. Oh yeah, we got approved. Or my drawings got approved for their permit. And so. Gas-fired roaster. Hopefully we'll be going in soon.

Jamie:

And then, and then it's time for coffee sketch blend.

Kurt Neiswender:

Oh yeah, that's right. We're on the list for 2 30, 2 famous now. So they have to keep, keep us on the wait list.

Jamie:

Right, right.

Kurt Neiswender:

But yeah, we're, we're, we're there. We're I'm glad, I'm glad we got our. Yeah, it's a very, a very small, small move of a job, as far as architecturally, it's really a very simple task, but it still required multiple departments to kind of get through. So, no, what is it? What is it? There are no small jobs, no small jobs, only small. I

Jamie:

don't know. I don't know this. I don't know this. I don't know this phrase. Is this a Michigander? This a Michigander

Kurt Neiswender:

phrase? I don't know. I think, I think it stops that there's no small chops. Okay. I don't know where I came up with that. So should we talk about a sketch? Yeah, we should. We, should we probably, we, sorry. We're probably making up for a couple of loss weeks from her turn to teach things and stay out of the snow. Yeah. So let me, let me share. It might, it might Dawn on people why I'm wearing the scarf. Cause we've got to support the beautiful game. I also have a student or two on the soccer team at Lawrence tech.

Jamie:

Very nice.

Kurt Neiswender:

And it's funny. They were, I was like, Hey, I actually did some advising this past couple of weeks again, keeping me keeping me from talking to Jamie. So I did some advising student advising and I was like, Hey, my, my, my good buddy sent me this, the scarf from Austin Verde. I was like, oh, Oh, that's cool. I don't, I don't really watch the American soccer. I'm like, that's MLS. He said, well, I'm from Spain. So what's a European league or is it, is it the European league with that Spain or is it Spanish? So, is it Spanish only? Like that's

Jamie:

just this yeah, there's Spanish only. And then, and then they, then they, they, if they're good enough, then they can play champions league and that's when you get, the Spanish playing against the English versus the Italian versus the,

Kurt Neiswender:

okay. Yeah. See, I need to, I need to work on it, but my one student, my one current student is his, dad's an article. And he's from Valencia and he played, he did his, so he did two years in architecture school in Spain at Valencia and played soccer professional. Oh, wow. And now he's, but I guess, I don't know, he's international. So like, cause if you come out of high school right here, You got to go to college. You can't play professionally and then play college sports as far as I thought, but being international coming here, I don't know. Maybe the rules changed. Anyhow. So yeah, he's kind of a big deal.

Jamie:

Yeah, it sounds like it that's, that's, that's, that's pretty good

Kurt Neiswender:

pretty stuff, but he listened to the class on Wednesday. So none of that matters

Jamie:

to me. You actually have to show up.

Kurt Neiswender:

Yeah, that's right. Sorry. Got a hot, fresh sketch here. Yeah.

Jamie:

So this is a sketch from this week. and, it is, kind of a know a nod to the poster art that I, I love and that we love, and graffiti and muralists. And, so in the. The background. you can see some familiar, somewhat familiar kind of stuff. We've, we've talked a little bit about that mural before. but this was, effectively like a commission. So I got to do a poster for, the. Women's soccer team here in Austin, that is playing professionally. they are a homegrown support, local soccer. they were sort of founded as a semi-pro team, opportunity for women in the community who wanted to have a, play really high-level stuff. people who were either had played in college or, had pursued sort of professional careers and, we're back in Austin and looking for an opportunity. So they they've had a variety of different players. Some of them have gone, back to the pros. one of their players last year is now playing in English. some of them had played for national teams. so it's a really interesting kind of Homer homegrown, grassroots, local soccer. but for, high level women's sports here in Austin, Austin is a soccer city. And so this is pretty exciting stuff and I've been fortunate, to, get to know them and, and, and work with their, their club for a couple of years now. and so they asked if I would, help. kind of, an art and the beautiful game, coinciding for match day posters. and so this is the first one, their first game is on the weekend. And so in the foreground, you've got sort of. player doing tricks on the sidewalk in front of a mural that is celebrating, the 19th amendment. So, women's empowerment here in downtown Austin. So real recognizable, huge mural by Shepard Fairey and, Montreal artist. And I just forgot her name,

Kurt Neiswender:

in the hashtag Sandra Chevron.

Jamie:

Yeah, sure. so, and she's from Montreal, of course. So, extra nods, but so, I got my,

Kurt Neiswender:

oh yeah, that's it shipper fairy or is that a collaboration?

Jamie:

And this is Shepard Fairey. This is an old one. but yeah, no, I just, I was, thinking of. trying to come up with ideas. we, we talk about sort of where the Genesis of some of these sketches come from and, this one was, what's, what's a real recognizable, kind of symbol of women and, and power and empowerment and celebration, in all. And, this is the mural that's sort of, the image that kind of came to mind and, did it. Did a pretty quick sketch, it's, it's full color, on the interwebs, but shown here in black and white, as, as the style for the coffee

Kurt Neiswender:

sketch. So is this one turning into a poster for the draft?

Jamie:

Yeah, so I scan this and then, and then did some digital work over the top of it, as well.

Kurt Neiswender:

Okay. Yeah, I can see it now because you did send me a, Well, teaser, text, text message, a photo of the Photoshop work. So I could see the, the, the shapes kind of coming together now. Yeah, that's really cool. And how long did, how long did this one take?

Jamie:

the whole, I mean the whole drawing actually, drawing and color was, just under it. so actually it was pretty quick, cause it's, fully rendered in color, all hand drawn. so yeah, then, Photoshop stuff took a little bit after that, but, but yeah, I was just under an hour for the drawing, so, which is, which is pretty good. hadn't, hadn't done something this big. in quite a while. So it was a, it was a good test under the gun and, and, and I decided to use some of the familiar Skye techniques and sort of employing a few different, ideas there.

Kurt Neiswender:

Yeah. It's actually kind of nice this, I was noticing that with the, the lines in the sky, the rendering, but also because you used, it looks like Prisma Martin. something like this. So, so you used the marker in between the pen work. And so it hasn't another layer of in this case, it's all black and white, but you have like the texture of the pen or the line weight of the pen versus the language of the marker and the sort of wetness that it leaves behind is also into the buildings and stuff. So. This is nice to see, because in some of the other ones, if we were to talk about the technicalities you would, if it was only pen, there might be more lines in that sky to sort of make up for some of the, the space that the, the Prisma colored marker is kind of taking. In this, in this particular drawing.

Jamie:

Yeah. No, and that's exactly right. I, and it was, as I started it and part of it was because it's so big. I mean, it's, it's a much bigger sketch. some of the effectiveness of that sky on the small sketches is sort of the, the front end. Aspect of all the lines, running parallel to one another and even, even with the spacing being varied. but on a bigger page with a bigger image, sort of scaling things up sort of super scale, If I knew that I was going to try and paint, paint the lines in between for paint the space in between, wasn't sure exactly how it was going to come out. but I think it was really, really successful. try a different technique with the pen so that it, it felt more like a brush stroke. hadn't done that in awhile. So that was, a little bit of trick with the Prismacolor. But what's interesting is, one of the, the building that's in the background behind the one that has the mural on it, is a really dark faced, almost granite colored building. And so there, I use that sort of really, really fine line technique to kind of get the added texture and darkness of the space.

Kurt Neiswender:

I mean, it has that. I mean, I could see the dark in the Prismacolor and the, I mean the depths in it too, it's receding into the background. And I note, so this soccer player too though, was, was actually live like you're are you in on-site with this? Or is it,

Jamie:

I was onsite for the. For the buildings. but the person is out of my

Kurt Neiswender:

head. Oh, okay. Cause I was wondering, it started to sound when you were describing it, like if it was like a sort of a promotional event or something, oh no, they had people kind of around downtown, but it's kind of, it's cool to that you, pick the sort of pose and. and, and the stipple, the stippling technique in the soccer ball.

Jamie:

Yeah. Thank you. Yeah. Well, I mean, and so, I, I, I started the sketch on-site, and, and blocked it in, took a photograph of it. and then, and that was about a 10 minute sketch. and then, Went back to the studio and sort of did the full-blown version. Ah, cool.

Kurt Neiswender:

Yeah. Very cool.

Jamie:

But yeah, poster art. So this is my, haven't done poster art in a while. So this was my nice experiment with that. So I'm glad I got to share it with you.

Kurt Neiswender:

Yeah, thanks. And actually, so the, the run, so now you showed me some of the Photoshop work. So is it going to be. Is it already done now at this point? So did you use, what kind of printing technique is it? like a simple inkjet? Yeah,

Jamie:

just they're they're just, they're just they're they're just printing them, inkjet to cool. Cool. Yeah. So, so one of those will be, no slipped in the mail for you. Oh,

Kurt Neiswender:

cool. That'd be great. Cause as you could see,

Jamie:

you got some room on

Kurt Neiswender:

the shelf. There's not a lot of decorations going on in here could use a little help. yeah. Very cool. Yeah. Thanks for, yeah. This is fun to kind of a. No, pull up, pull a recent, recent drawing together. And, I look forward to seeing the finished artwork and, thanks for obliging, my, my diversions toward talking about some of the schoolwork. it's been fun, as, as, as it, as time-consuming as it can be, I still enjoy the teaching aspect. there's a lot of things behind the scenes that. I guess I didn't think would take a lot of time, but those things do little eat, he eat into the day. I will know. Yeah.

Jamie:

Every everything, everything ends up, take up a little bit more

Kurt Neiswender:

time.

Jamie:

Right. Right. Well, but the thing is, is that it's, it's very evident when you talk about it, how, how much it means to you. So, keep at it, my friend.

Kurt Neiswender:

Oh, thanks. Thanks. I appreciate that. And, I guess on that note, we will let everybody go. So thanks.

Jamie:

Getting close to a hundred, getting close to a hundred.